What To Do When Your Newborn Baby Doesn’t Like To Be Swaddled

Some Newborn Babies Don’t Like Swaddles - Here’s What To Do

For most new parents, when it comes to their newborn babies, swaddling seems an obvious choice. Swaddling is meant to mimic life inside the womb where baby has had every single one of their needs met for the previous nine months! It’s that wrapped, tight feeling of the swaddle that helps baby feel comfortable, safe and secure. But if your newborn doesn’t like the swaddle or even worse, your newborn hates the swaddle, chances are, you will know! They may fuss more than usual, or act like a little escape artist, or simply react in a way that translates to “no, no no!” Remember, no one knows your baby better than you do, so trust your instincts. If your newborn baby doesn’t like to be swaddled, you’re not alone, and there are options. Below are some FAQs on how to handle things if your baby doesn’t like the swaddle!

What should I do if my baby doesn't like to be swaddled?

If your baby appears unhappy in the swaddle, it may be time to try something new... like your approach. Swaddling takes practice and if baby seems fussy every time you wrap her up, and the swaddle doesn’t seem to calm her, it may mean that the swaddle needs to be just a little tighter! At least around their arms. Make another attempt at a slightly tighter swaddle when things feel calmer and perhaps baby isn’t as tired. This may make a difference… and if it doesn’t, don’t worry! If your newborn doesn’t like to be swaddled, a sleep sack / wearable blanket is a great option. The Dreamland Baby Weighted Sleep Swaddle is a sleep sack that has a removable swaddle arm – this helps make swaddling a breeze. It is designed to help your baby feel calm, fall asleep faster and stay asleep longer. The gentle weight naturally reduces stress and increases relaxation through deep-pressure stimulation to give your baby feelings of security and comfort…. And if baby still doesn’t like the swaddle, simply remove it, and you’ll have yourself a sleep sack!

Should I be worried if my newborn baby hates being swaddled?

Chances are if your newborn baby hates the swaddle, you feel as if you’ve done something wrong. But guess what? You’re doing everything right! Picking up on your infant’s cue’s shows that you know your baby, and that you know him well! If you see signs that baby doesn’t want to be swaddled, like irritability, restlessness, and/or they try to escape from that baby burrito every single time, there are other options out there – like a wearable blanket (also known as a sleep sack) so try not to worry and remember to breathe!

Is it normal for my newborn to not like being swaddled?

Every baby is different and no two will respond to anything the same way! So when it comes to being swaddled, your baby may not like it. However, while it may seem counterintuitive, it could be your swaddle technique. Make sure you read manufacturer’s instructions (some swaddle blankets even come with videos or online instructions) to ensure that you’re swaddling properly. It could be a matter of pressure – as in the swaddle may be wrapped too loose. While it may be frustrating, it’s worth a few attempts and adjustments. But when it becomes really clear that baby doesn’t like swaddle, it may be time to move on.

When do babies typically stop liking swaddling?

Once your little one is able to roll over on their own, they typically no longer like the swaddle as it may restrict their movement. While every baby is different and starts to roll over at different times, this milestone is usually reached between two and four months old.  By then it’s a great idea to move to a wearable blanket to ensure that your baby is still safe in her sleep space. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), “bare is best” meaning that soft bedding such as blankets, pillows and soft toys should be kept out of the baby's sleep space to avoid accidental suffocation, the leading cause of SIDS. Which makes a sleep sack the perfect option!

What are signs that my newborn baby doesn’t like to be swaddled?

In those early days, weeks, and months of adjusting to life with baby, there are so many things to pay attention to as your baby’s means of communicating are fairly limited! But if you notice her squirming, fidgety, or crying when in the swaddle, it’s possible it’s just not for her! This is when a wearable blanket may come in handy. This is ideal as it keeps baby safe, regulates her body temperature, and helps ensure a good night’s sleep.

Can I train my baby to sleep in a swaddle?

When it comes to swaddling, in addition to the womb-like benefits of warmth, comfort, and security, it’s actually the safest way for baby to sleep. Wrap them in their little burrito bundle, place them to sleep on their backs – always, always, always on their back! – and let the zzz’s begin! Once baby starts to roll over though, it may be time to retire the swaddle blanket (although you can use it for all sorts of things like a nursing cover, diaper quick change cover up, and more!). It’s around this time that sleep “training” starts – anywhere between two and four months old.

Is swaddling the best way for newborn babies to sleep?

For most new parents, swaddling does in fact, seem to be the best way for babies to get the best sleep. That’s because swaddling is meant to sooth your newborn infant as they get used to life outside the womb. Those first few months of life are sometimes referred to as the “fourth trimester” and to help ease that transition, swaddling is meant to mimic life inside the womb where baby has lived so snuggly for the past nine months. It’s that wrapped, tight feeling that helps baby feel comfortable, safe and secure. Swaddling also helps flailing arms and legs that can trigger baby’s startle reflex (also known as the Moro reflex) that can wake her up during precious sleep time. But don’t worry if you discover that swaddling just isn’t working out. The Dreamland Baby Weighted Sleep Swaddle is a sleep sack that has a removable swaddle arm – this helps make swaddling a breeze. It is designed to help your baby feel calm, fall asleep faster and stay asleep longer.